David McCracken

Print Curator

david@peacockvisualarts.co.uk

Michael Waight

Master Printmaker

michael@peacockvisualarts.co.uk

James Vass

Printmaker

james@peacockvisualarts.co.uk
Open Tuesday – Saturday 9.30am – 5.30pm. Modest charges apply for use of production facilities. Health and Safety regulations recommend that workshops are not advisable during pregnancy.

Printmaking workshops | Courses & classes


We have organised a series of one day printmaking workshops during February and March. Led by our friendly, experienced and supportive tutors Michael Waight and James Vass, our printmaking workshops are suitable for any skill level. Call 01224 639539 to speak to someone and to book your place. If you can’t find the best printmaking workshop for you, you can also arrange one-to-one tuition with us at very reasonable rates. Just bring yourself – all materials are included. Hurry and book so you can start printing! Printmaking workshop techniques available are:

One-Day Screenprinting Workshop

Come and enjoy a day of colour, where you have a chance to learn the basics of this exciting technique. Explore the creative possibilities of this colourful, graphic and immediate approach to making repeat prints. The technique of scraping ink through a fine mesh can be quick to get results and by adding thin layers of colour you soon build up wonderful effects and images.

  • Tutor: James Vass
  • Date: Saturday 27 Feb 2016
  • Time: 10am – 5pm
  • Cost: £75/65 conc. Gift vouchers available
Screenprinting technique
By far the most recent of the print media, screenprinting is basically a stencil process. A stencil is applied to a fine mesh (the screen) which has been stretched over a frame. Ink is then pushed, with a flexible-bladed squeegee, through the remaining areas of open mesh onto the paper below.
 Toby Paterson Arraybox
Screenprint by Toby Paterson The screen can be prepared in many different ways. Here are three of the most common methods: Hand-painted stencils can be made using propriety screen fillers. Interesting effects can be obtained by thining the fillers with water to form washes which can print as a half-tone. Photo stencils are the most commonly used. An image is transferred or painted directly onto a sheet of grained acetate using photopaque paint. As a seperate acetate sheet has to be used for each colour, these sheets are known as ‘separations’. A screen is coated with light sensitive emulsion which, when dry, is placed on top of the separation which has been laid on a glass topped table. A flexible rubber sheet is pulled over the table, screen and separation and air is evacuated by a vacuum pump ensuring a perfect contact. The screen is then exposed to ultra-violet light which passes through the glass and acetate to harden the emulsion. The opaque painting protects the emulsion behind it from light, allowing it to remain soft. The screen is then washed out with water and the soft parts of the emulsion dissolve away, leaving areas of open mesh through which ink can pass. Photographic stencils are prepared in the same way, with a film being used instead of a painted separating.
Screenprinting Class

Screenprinting Weekend Workshop

Join James Vass on this weekend workshop for a chance to learn the basics of this exciting technique. Explore the creative possibilities of this colourful, graphic and immediate approach to making repeat prints. You will learn how to expose transparent images using UV light and print different layers to build up your image. No experience necessary – just a bit of creativity.

  • Tutor: James Vass
  • Date: Sat 20th & Sun 21st of Feb 2016
  • Time: 10am – 5pm
  • Cost: £130/95 conc. Gift vouchers available
Screenprinting technique
By far the most recent of the print media, screenprinting is basically a stencil process. A stencil is applied to a fine mesh (the screen) which has been stretched over a frame. Ink is then pushed, with a flexible-bladed squeegee, through the remaining areas of open mesh onto the paper below.
 Toby Paterson Arraybox
Screenprint by Toby Paterson The screen can be prepared in many different ways. Here are three of the most common methods: Hand-painted stencils can be made using propriety screen fillers. Interesting effects can be obtained by thining the fillers with water to form washes which can print as a half-tone. Photo stencils are the most commonly used. An image is transferred or painted directly onto a sheet of grained acetate using photopaque paint. As a seperate acetate sheet has to be used for each colour, these sheets are known as ‘separations’. A screen is coated with light sensitive emulsion which, when dry, is placed on top of the separation which has been laid on a glass topped table. A flexible rubber sheet is pulled over the table, screen and separation and air is evacuated by a vacuum pump ensuring a perfect contact. The screen is then exposed to ultra-violet light which passes through the glass and acetate to harden the emulsion. The opaque painting protects the emulsion behind it from light, allowing it to remain soft. The screen is then washed out with water and the soft parts of the emulsion dissolve away, leaving areas of open mesh through which ink can pass. Photographic stencils are prepared in the same way, with a film being used instead of a painted separating.
Linocutting Class

One-Day Linocutting Workshop

Join Mike Waight for this one-day workshop, where he will show you how to master the art of the linocut. By cutting away the areas you don’t want to print, these lino blocks can be printed with hand rollers – with or without the use of a press, and are therefore very suitable for printing almost anywhere.

  • Tutor: Mike Waight
  • Date: Saturday 27 Feb 2016
  • Time: 10am – 5pm
  • Cost: £75/65 conc. Gift vouchers available
Relief printing technique
A flat surface such as wood or lino is gouged into by using a number of curve-bladed chisels. These tools dig into the wood or lino creating hollowed out areas or linear grooves which are lower than the surface.
With a roller, a generous layer of ink is rolled onto a glass slab and then rolled from the glass to the relief block. The roller only touches the surface of the block and avoids getting ink on the areas that have been cut away. The relief block is placed on the press with its inked image facing upwards. Dry or dampened printmaking paper is carefully lain on top. Thin paper or card is placed on top of this to add extra pressure. By pulling a handle, a flat metal plate drops down onto the back of the print, stamping sufficient pressure and allowing the ink from the wood or lino to imprint the image onto the paper.
Bookbinding

One-Day Bookbinding – Part Two

This is a fantastic for those who have done some bookbinding before, to learn to create slightly more complexed and time consuming book forms!

  • Tutor: Mike Waight
  • Date: Saturday 5 March 2016
  • Time: 10am – 5pm
  • Cost: £75/65 conc. Gift vouchers available

Screenprinting Class

Screenprinting Weekend Workshop

Join James Vass on this weekend workshop for a chance to learn the basics of this exciting technique. Explore the creative possibilities of this colourful, graphic and immediate approach to making repeat prints. You will learn how to expose transparent images using UV light and print different layers to build up your image. No experience necessary – just a bit of creativity.

  • Tutor: James Vass
  • Date: Sat 26th & Sun 27th March 2016
  • Time: 10am – 5pm
  • Cost: £130/95 conc. Gift vouchers available
Screenprinting technique
By far the most recent of the print media, screenprinting is basically a stencil process. A stencil is applied to a fine mesh (the screen) which has been stretched over a frame. Ink is then pushed, with a flexible-bladed squeegee, through the remaining areas of open mesh onto the paper below.
 Toby Paterson Arraybox
Screenprint by Toby Paterson The screen can be prepared in many different ways. Here are three of the most common methods: Hand-painted stencils can be made using propriety screen fillers. Interesting effects can be obtained by thining the fillers with water to form washes which can print as a half-tone. Photo stencils are the most commonly used. An image is transferred or painted directly onto a sheet of grained acetate using photopaque paint. As a seperate acetate sheet has to be used for each colour, these sheets are known as ‘separations’. A screen is coated with light sensitive emulsion which, when dry, is placed on top of the separation which has been laid on a glass topped table. A flexible rubber sheet is pulled over the table, screen and separation and air is evacuated by a vacuum pump ensuring a perfect contact. The screen is then exposed to ultra-violet light which passes through the glass and acetate to harden the emulsion. The opaque painting protects the emulsion behind it from light, allowing it to remain soft. The screen is then washed out with water and the soft parts of the emulsion dissolve away, leaving areas of open mesh through which ink can pass. Photographic stencils are prepared in the same way, with a film being used instead of a painted separating.
Terms and Conditions
Occasionally due to circumstances beyond our control Peacock may have to cancel courses and we reserve the right to do so with a minimum of one weeks notice prior to the start date. Full refunds will be given for any courses cancelled by Peacock Visual Arts. For cancellation by course participants, full refunds will be given to those cancelling one month prior to the course start date. If cancellation notice is given two weeks prior to the course start date Peacock can only guarantee to refund 50% of the original cost of the course. No refund can be guaranteed if less notice is given. In this instance Peacock course fees may be refunded at Peacock’s discretion, only if we are able to fill your place. To help us do this it is important to let us know as soon as possible that you will be unable to attend.

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